Tours

Brochure

City tour

After a quick shuttle ride into town, enjoy this 3-hour walking tour highlighting Baie-Comeau’s heritage area, including two heritage churches. St. Amélie’s Church features the pink granite of Québec’s North Shore. Visitors can admire its 1,500 square meters of frescoes, the 30 stainedglass windows representing characters from the Bible, and the magnificent Casavant organ. Later in the tour, there’s a stop at St. Andrew Anglican Church. This lovely Anglican Church built in 1937 was the first church in the Baie-Comeau area.It is built in the Tudor style, with imposing oak trim and lovely stained glass windows.The main window depicts local forest animals.

The tour continues to Champlain Street, where former Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney spent his childhood. Tour participants will also have the opportunity to visit the town’s famous hotel, Manoir Baie-Comeau, where cake and tea will be served.

In 1937, the same year he founded the town of Baie-Comeau, Robert Rutherford McCormick built a sumptuous manor. In 1965, the manor burned to the ground. The QNSL paper company rebuilt it on the same site, using stone instead of wood, and it was fully renovated in 2004. Now a hotel with all the charm of an old French colonial manor, it offers spectacular views of the St. Lawrence River.When the tour ends at Place La Salle, guests may either stay in town or return immediately to the ship.

Best of Baie-Comeau

This tour, combining history, nature, and technology, is another great way to get an overview of Baie-Comeau!Colonel Robert McCormick, the president of the Chicago Tribune, founded the city in 1937 when he established a pulp and paper plant to control costs for his newspaper business.Today, Baie-Comeau is a high-tech industrial hub for hydroelectricity and home to about 23,000 residents.On this tour you will learn about the town’s rich religious and cultural heritage, as well as the resilient character of the hearty souls living in this remote paradise.

The tour begins with a photo stop at the magnificent Havre St. Pancrace lookout, elevation600 meters. During Prohibition in the 1930s, this isolated bay was a popular delivery point for contraband liquor! Then it’s on to a typical lumberjack village. The forest industry was crucial to the development of the North Shore.Activities such as cutting, hauling, log driving, and other aspects of logging life are presented at this interpretation center.Typical buildings, period objects, and old photographs illustrate lumberjacks’ living conditions and way of life of this period. Get a taste of a typical lumberjack meal, which clocked inat around 2,000 calories.

The tour will conclude with a short visit to Baie-Comeau’s heritage area, including Place La Salle.This quaint commercial street—home of Biosphere Square and full of sites of historical interest—bustles with specialty food shops, souvenir stores, art galleries, fine restaurants, and nightclubs. Other tour stops include the Mance lookout, where visitors can admire the magnificent scenery, and Champlain Street, where former Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney spent his childhood.At the end of the tour, guests may either return immediately to the ship or stay in town if time permits.

Manic-2 and city tour

This tour combines a visit to Manic-2, a spectacular hollow-joint gravity dam, with a mini-city tour of Baie-Comeau.Participants will have the chance to visit Manic-2, ahugehollow-joint gravity dam big enough to house a Boeing 747 inside and the first dam to be put into service at the Manic-Outardes complex. It is here that Hydro-Québec commissioned the world’s first 735 kV high voltage transmission line, which went into operation in 1965 and helped set a new international standard for high-voltage transmission.The line is linked to a generating station with the capacity to supply electricity to a city of 250,000 people. Visitors tour the Georges-D’or building, which holds an actual turbine, an exhibit hall, and a multimedia room that explains the construction and operation of the dam. This is followed by a guided tour into the heart of the dam and a visit to one of the station’s powerful generators. It’s the perfect opportunity to discover how electricity is produced and delivered to our homes. Inside the generating station, you can stand beneath a turbine-generator unit and feel its immense power as the 400-tonne structure rotates at a rate of 120 revolutions per minutes.

The tour will conclude with a short visit to Baie-Comeau’s heritage area, including Place La Salle.This quaint commercial artery—home of Biosphere Square and full of sites of historical interest—bustles with specialty food shops, souvenir stores, art galleries, fine restaurants, and nightclubs. Other stops include the Mance lookout, where visitors can admire the magnificent scenery, and Champlain Street, where former Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney spent his childhood.At the end of the tour, guests may either return immediately to the ship or stay in town if time permits.

Manic-5 and city tour

Visit Manic-5 and let yourself be mesmerized by the DanielJohnson Dam, the largest multiple-arch-and-buttress dam in the world. Its unique design is a testament to Québec’s engineering genius.Its main arch is high enough to contain the Montréal Olympic Stadium! The views from the foot of the dam, inside the central arch and from the crest are truly awe-inspiring.

Pioneer’s road

This tour examines many facets of Baie-Comeau’s history, including the history of the logging industry and of navigation on the St. Lawrence River.

The first stop is the National Center for the St. Lawrence River Shipwrecks, which tells the story of numerous strange and remarkable shipwrecks in Baie-Trinité.A multimedia show at the center allows visitors to revisit a moment in Québec’s history and “board” the Elizabeth and Mary, a ship from the fleet of Admiral William Phipps, which sank in 1690. Stories of other shipwrecks are also told.Guests can admire artifactsretrieved from various shipwrecks or simply wander the beach and possibly observe whales, dolphins, or seals.Then it’s on to the Pointe-des-Monts lighthouse. Built on a rocky point at the mouth of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the lighthouse is testament to a time when navigating the St. Lawrence was often a dangerous challenge. With therise in maritime traffic between the United Kingdom and Canada in the early 19th century, the number of shipwrecks also increased.So it was that a series of lighthouses was built to guide ships and provide a place of refuge where shipwreck survivors could find food and shelter.The Pointe-des-Monts lighthouse went into service in 1830, equipped with a whale-oil lamp, and underwent numerous improvements until it ceased operation in 1964.There are exhibits on all seven floors: furniture, interpretive panels, photos illustrating the living conditions of the lightkeepers, and stories of shipwrecks and the survivors who sometimes had to stay here throughout the entire winter.The final tour stop is the lumberjack village; the forest industry was crucial to the development of the North Shore. Activities such as cutting, hauling, log driving, and other aspects of logging life are presented at this interpretation center. Typical buildings, period objects, and old photographs illustrate lumberjacks’ living conditions and way of life of this period. Get a taste of a typical lumberjack meal, which clocked in at around 2,000 calories.

Glaciers' Garden and city tour

Unique in the world, exclusive to Baie-Comeau, and right in the heart of the Manicouagan-Uapishka Biosphere Reserve, the Garden of Glaciers offers the best immersive, interactive, and multi-sensory experience in Canada.Visitors enjoy a unique immersion in the last ice age, climate change and the migration of the first people to ever set foot in North America. This world-class multimedia show allows you to explore a glacier from top to bottom and even gives you a glimpse of the ancient seas that lie beneath.The goal is to inspire you to see the world in a different light by telling the fascinatingstory of the glaciers.As we pursue this multifaceted mission, we strive to transform your visit into a unique multi-sensory experience.

The Glacier Exploration Station is built around a multimedia show divided into three acts. It begins with the “Vastness of the Glaciers,” a series of 3D-inspired projections that fly you over a glacier that has evolved and been shaped by the Earth’s changing climate over the course of millennia. You will learn how, 20 000 years ago, most of the Northern Hemisphere was encased in a thick layer of ice. You will then hop in a virtual elevator that takes you 4 km beneath the glacier, into an environment of immersive visuals and stunning sound effects.There, you will witness the perpetual movement of the ice mass and understand the impact it had on the North Shore of the St. Lawrence River when it melted some 10,000 years ago.Finally, in the last act, you’ll discover the “Ancient Seas of Québec.”In 2010, the glacier exploration center received the “Best Show” award from the Canadian Association of Science Centres.

The tour will conclude with a short visit to Baie-Comeau’s heritage area, including Place La Salle. This quaint commercial artery, home of Biosphere Square and full of sites of historical interest, bustles with specialty food shops, souvenir stores, art galleries, fine restaurants, and nightclubs. Other stops include the Mance lookout, where visitors can admire the magnificent scenery, and Champlain Street, where former Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney spent his childhood. At the end of the tour, guests may either return immediately to the ship or stay in town if time permits

Seashell Valley and city tour

Unique in the world, exclusive to Baie-Comeau, and right in the heart of the Manicouagan-Uapishka Reserve, this tour takes you to a truly remarkable geological marvel. Follow the English River for 10 km, deep into the boreal forest, whereamidst the fall colors, you will discover the most impressive seashell wall in the world. Known as Seashell Valley, this unique site is made up of tons of seashells piled one on the top of the other over a 10,000-year period, the remnant of an ancient sea.This shell deposit, the only of its kind in the world, provides a post-glacial whirlwind tour of the natural events that caused the land to emerge from the ancient sea. Standing some 50 feet high, these incredible banks made up almost entirely of shells are an amazing site to behold. You’ll enjoy the excavation and identification activities designed to offer a better understanding of this unusual phenomenon. Seashell Valley is classified as an “Exceptional Geological Site” by Natural Resources Canada.

The tour will conclude with a short visit to Baie-Comeau’s heritage area, including Place La Salle. This quaint commercial artery, home of Biosphere Square and full of sites of historical interest, bustles with specialty food shops, souvenir stores, art galleries, fine restaurants, and nightclubs. Other stops include the Mance lookout, where visitors can admire the magnificent scenery, and Champlain Street, where former Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney spent his childhood. At the end of the tour, guests may either return immediately to the ship or stay in town if time permits.

Pointe-aux-Outardes' Nature Park & Innu culture

Parc nature Pointe-aux-Outardes offers an unforgettable sensory and cultural voyage into 8 different ecosystems, including sand dunes, boreal forest, a salt marsh, and a beach—plus an introduction to Innu culture in the company of Wabush. He will take you on a tour through parklands that were once part of the Innu’s hunting ground and introduce you to various aspects of his culture, exploring themes like food and cooking (bannock tasting), hunting and fishing, housing, transportation, and spirituality. To complete your tour, enjoy a stroll along the park’s 10km network of trails or join in mycology activities. Pick and identify, wild mushroom from the park. Taste North Shore mushrooms and get to know different recipes.Birders can explore the boreal forest and the edge of the immense salt marsh, wander over majestic sand dunes and contemplate the beauty of the Rivière aux Outardes estuary where it meets the St. Lawrence.Birds of prey, shorebirds, songbirds and seabirds all congregate at the park to take advantage of its rich environment. The Park’s mission is to protect and showcase this wildlife and these rich yet fragile ecosystems.

The tour will conclude with a short visit to Baie-Comeau’s heritage area, including Place La Salle. This quaint commercial artery, home of Biosphere Square and full of sites of historical interest, bustles with specialty food shops, souvenir stores, art galleries, fine restaurants, and nightclubs. Other stops include the Mance lookout, where visitors can admire the magnificent scenery, and Champlain Street, where former Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney spent his childhood. At the end of the tour, guests may either return immediately to the ship or stay in town if time permits

Hiking

A wonderful tour for nature lovers right in downtown Baie-Comeau! Boisé de la Pointe-Saint-Gilles is an urban woodland,home to many of the plant and animal species found on Québec’s North Shore. Sculptures, rest areas, benches, great viewpoints, interpretation panels and boardwalks allow visitors to relax, observe and enjoy the lovely surroundings. Located at the confluence of the Manicouagan and St. Lawrence Rivers, this splendid 175-hectare park boasts a variety of trails amidsturban, forest, river, and lake environments. Enjoy breathtaking views of the St. Lawrence from the 11 miles of trails. Accompanied by your local guide, learn about North Shore birds, wildlife, and plants. Boisé de la Pointe-Saint-Gilles is also one of the most important wintering grounds for Barrow’s Goldeneye in eastern North America.

Culinary workshop

La Cache d’Amélie is considered one of the finest restaurants on the North Shore. Enjoy an unforgettable culinary experience with chef Glenn Forbes in a workshop that gives you a taste of local delicacies; small game, seafood, tartares and more.